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Posts tagged ‘Black and White by Paul Volponi’

Choosing Character Names For Novels, by Paul Volponi

In my house, one of our great joys is the naming of a new pet. We have dogs, cats, and even a bearded dragon. My choices of names usually lose out to those of my wife and daughter (personally, I thought Barkley was a great name for a dog), but there is one place where I get to actually see my name choices come to fruition – in my Young Adult novels.

My inspirations for names come from a variety of places. Some come from students whom I have taught, some come from names I have seen across the back shoulders of sports jerseys, some come to me while listening to other people’s conversations in the street (it’s not that hard with everyone on cell phones these days), and some even arise from classic literature (I named a poker player Huck because the final card in Texas Hold’em is called ‘the River’). I keep a running list of names that I like and may one day want to use in a novel.

I also use a dictionary of names – and no, it’s not cheating. I enjoy hearing the meaning of names in dictionaries, sometimes matching them to a character’s qualities (in Hurricane Song, the preacher is named Culver, which means “dove”). Did you know that Shakespeare coined the name Jessica for a female? Previously, it had only been seen in the masculine form.

Are there any rules for naming characters? Well, obviously not. I do tend to stay away from very common names, such as Jim, John, Jane, and Mary. I also don’t want characters in the same book to have names that are too similar, such as Mr Johnson and Mrs Jones. Sometimes my characters, even really important ones, are simply referred to by their roles, instead of their names. For instance, in Black and White, a prominent character is referred to as Marcus’ mother, rather than by her actual name.

You should feel satisfied with the character names you choose. Don’t settle. I suppose some writers, without a concrete name in mind, can begin to write scenes, perhaps using a dummy name or ***** in its place. To me, that’s counter-productive. The names of your characters can stand for your ideas and represent them in a memorable way to the reading public. I want the main character’s name to have an intimate connection with the character’s development. For example, in Rooftop, the main protagonist is named Clay, because he will be moulded into a man in the pages to come. In Hurricane Song, the protagonist with a long journey ahead of him is named Miles. I can’t say for sure that readers in general pick up on those things. I’ve had a few teens bring those images/names up to me, wanting to discuss their origins. I do feel that they make an impact on a deeper, subconscious level.

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Paul Volponi’s author website: www.paulvolponibooks.com

Paul Volponi’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

Black and WhiteRikers HighRooftopHurricane Song     Deadly Little Voices (a Touch Novel) (Touch Novels)Shock PointTarzan: The Jungle Warrior: Bk. 2

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Coarse Language in Teen Novels, by Paul Volponi

Probably the first rule of being a novelist is to be truthful and honest in everything you produce. That means putting the right words into your characters’ mouths. For me, part of that truthfulness is occasionally having my characters use profanities. Now let me make this 100% clear. I never have my characters cursing to simply look cool or grab the reader’s attention. I only have them do so when the scene dictates a tense or angry mood in which real people might use these very emotional words.

Black and White, which centers on racial prejudice, has a fair number of racial slurs. So does Response, which is a about NYC hate crime, and Rooftop, which is about the shooting of an unarmed black teen by the police. The language is there because these are the real words I have heard people use in the real-life situations mirrored in these novels. The books just wouldn’t ring true if the language wasn’t correct. People committing a hate crime don’t say “please” and “thank you” when they’re beating some one over the head with an aluminum baseball bat.

Rikers High is about teens going to school while awaiting trial in the world’s largest jail. As you can imagine, the daily conversation of these teens, even in some less-than-dramatic situations, was froth with what some would deem offensive language. But that’s real. Should the writer change this reality and omit this language? If so, what would be the rational?

I have never had a publisher ask me to remove a curse word because they thought it would hurt sales. Many of my books are taught in high schools and even middle schools. It is true that I have encountered several teachers, from very conservative US states, who tell me that they are afraid some parents might complain about the language if they used my novels. But I’m very content to lose a few schools here and there, when so many reluctant readers gravitate to the novels, feeling the work relates to the lives they actually live.

Recently, I received a letter from a parent who was upset that a character of mine uttered a curse word as he was being robbed at gunpoint. The parent said that I was a bad influence on teens today because of the profanity. Sadly enough, the complaint did not reflect any concern over the fact that a gun was being pointed at someone in the scene. Most of the teens with whom I work pick up on that parent’s inconsistency almost immediately. As a writer, you will have to decide for yourself what language your characters will use during tense moments. My standing rule is: If it doesn’t feel and sound real, it probably won’t ring true to smart and street-wise teenage readers.

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Paul Volponi’s author website: www.paulvolponibooks.com

Paul Volponi’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

Black and WhiteRooftopRikers HighResponse     Girl, StolenAugustThe Last of the Warrior Kings

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

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