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Posts from the ‘Graphic novelist’ Category

The Young Adult Fiction Industry, by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

Working in Young Adult fiction sometimes feels like I’ve been let into a secret awesome club. It really is a community, a warm and welcoming little village of YA, comprised of authors, editors, agents, teachers, librarians, bloggers and readers. It’s a small world and everyone knows and loves everyone else. It’s such a great place and I don’t think any industry has quite what we have here in the YA world.

Positivity is the word that really springs to mind when I think of YA. Since I started writing it, I’ve become friends with other authors, and with editors, people from other publishing houses and divisions, bloggers who talk about my books and fans who send me emails. There’s no real divide, no “I’m an author, and you’re a (fill in the blank),” everyone is equal and friendly and we all have something in common – books.

The people who read Young Adult fiction are some of the most passionate people you will ever meet. Teens that read YA have SO much competition for their attention – television, video games, school (why did I make school third?), friends, family, jobs, chores. They make time to read. It’s something they seek out and pursue. Librarians and teachers love our industry because we get kids reading. There’s so much talk and debate, so much passion and deep enjoyment.

The one complaint I see pop up is about the opposite of positivity – the idea that somehow YA authors aren’t writing simple positive values-ridden books, that we write swears, and sex, and violence, and corrupt children and teens. I’d argue even the worst of these books are doing a positive thing by getting teens to read, by showing them they aren’t alone in their feelings, opening communication, promoting or even prompting discussion, and being a realistic window into the world.

Being a teen is difficult, it’s a lengthy process of challenging and changing everything you know about the world, closing a very long chapter of your life and opening a new one. These are weighty subjects. These aren’t just books to read and forget on an airplane ride, these books and characters bond with readers in ways few other books do. I see it in the emails I get, sometimes they’re a nice simple “thank you,” or “I really connected with that story”. Other times I get very heartfelt confessionals. These books matter.

That’s why I love writing YA, and why working in this industry is constantly surprising, moving, and magical. Because it’s not just an industry, it’s a living, breathing community. We all connect.

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Stephen Emond’s author website: www.stephenemond.com

Stephen Emond’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

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HappyfaceWinter Town     A Coalition of LionsTarzan: The Greystoke LegacyHold Me Closer, Necromancer

Writing Teen Novels
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Time And The Publishing Process, by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

There’s a good delay with books. It’s a time-consuming process, both writing the book and going through the publication process. Things like comic books or a daily comic strip can be really appealing because you have a constant contact with your audience. Every day or every month you can put your latest work out and you’re never far from your public’s mind. Stand up comics often have trouble doing any kind of written material because they’re so used to an immediate feedback from their material. With books, with what I’m writing now, you have to worry that what you’re writing will still be relevant, or topical a year or two down the line. Or that world events don’t render it irrelevant or distasteful, or that someone else doesn’t have the idea you’ve been spending months refining and beat you to the punch. Alas, all you can do is your part and hope the rest falls into place.

Personally, I usually have a handful of ideas on hand in various states of readiness. So, oftentimes I have a vague idea of what my next book is while I’m still working on a current project. The way I work, having a regular publisher, editor and agent, is I’ll develop the idea I want to do into a detailed outline, I’ll work on sample chapters and I’ll get a really decent-length pitch put together. This can take anywhere from a couple of months to over a year, as has been the case for this book I am writing now.

Winter Town came out in December of 2011 but I’d been working on the pitch for a while before that, so certainly over a year to develop this into a good pitch I can be proud of and ready to write. From there, my editor has to sell this idea to the other editors and marketing teams in an acquisitions meeting. A lot of people have to sign on and say yes, this book sounds good; this deserves to be on the shelves; and yes, we think we can sell this. Even if it was completely written already and was a masterpiece, there are only so many books a publishing house can put out per season. If spring 2013 is filled up, or if it’d get lost in all the powerhouse books coming out in fall of 2013, it would still get pushed out a year. Maybe if I was James Patterson they could make a case for getting it out sooner, but I’m no James Patterson.

In my case it works out. This gives me most of the year to finish writing the book. It gives us time to revise it and go through a few rounds of edits. It gives Little, Brown & Co time to print advance copies, to shop it around and build up interest before it’s officially released. To the public, it’d seem that I disappear for a couple years and return with a shiny new book, but really all that time is spent working, writing, revising, marketing and planning for the release.

It’s a lengthy process, putting a book out, with very little of the process spent in the public eye, generally right around the release there’s a big hoopla, interviews and talks and book shelves, and then it all goes quiet again as we work on the next one.

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Stephen Emond’s author website: www.stephenemond.com

Stephen Emond’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

HappyfaceWinter Town     In Mozart's Shadow: His Sister's StoryMy Brother's ShadowRikers High

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Talking About My Writing At Conferences, by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

It can be really jarring being an author. It seems perfect for a quiet, unassuming shy fellow (that’s me). You sit in a room and type out words; you write stories and create worlds; you can play around, say all the things you think and live the life you want, all from the comfort of your home, maybe with a muffin and a cup of coffee. You create that wonderful book; you get an agent; you get a publisher; your book is released; and you’ve communicated with the whole world and touched so many lives, all from your computer screen.

Then you get the call: “We’ve booked you to speak at a teacher’s conference in Chicago next month, start packing!”

Speak?! Teacher’s conference?! My high school English teachers would spit out their water if they knew I was even writing a book! I have to somehow teach THEM something? Speak???

This thought process loops for weeks, getting louder, with pounding echoes. I write! Not speak! These are two exceptionally different skill sets. People who are great writers and great speakers still amaze me. I imagine if you can speak well, if you’re that social and outgoing, then you wouldn’t be the type to do the actual quiet writing part. That’s the case for myself, at least. I got just such a call. In fact, when I’d written Happyface I had to do a book release party in my hometown, an English teacher’s conference in Chicago, a librarian conference in Pennsylvania and another teacher conference in Texas. I was petrified.

I’d never been one to raise my hand in class, or volunteer to read a passage, or for any reason choose to stand in front of a class. In most of those cases, you’d be expected to talk for a few minutes. Here I was supposed to talk to a quiet room for 20, 30 or 40 minutes!

Imagine, if you will, a montage sequence, set to the music of your choosing. I’m listing every noteworthy event that happened in the creation of the book; thinking about all the conversations I had with my editor; searching desperately for any little nugget of information I can pad out a half hour with; creating any artwork I can to at least divert a few eyes off of me; and getting on a plane, sitting in a hotel room, reading over notes and timing myself.

So much of the anxiety is just getting to ‘the moment’. I guarantee you the five minutes before a speech are always worse than the five minutes after beginning a speech, and the five minutes after a speech can be near-euphoric.

One thing that bridges the ‘speaker’ and the ‘writer’ is that it’s the actual writing you’re speaking about. I never had to recite someone else’s work or talk about something I didn’t care about, and that helps. I can’t say I’m the best speaker, but each time I’ve gotten through it.

Oddly enough, those times end up being the memories I look back on the most at the end of the year. I think to myself, “I’m a WRITER, not a SPEAKER!” I just want to WRITE. At the end of a trip like that, I think back, talking with other authors, speaking about my books, traveling, signing, hearing from people who’ve read my stuff, wrapped up in a whirlwind of activity all centered around not only books but MY books, those things I spent all that time writing. I have to remember, that this is part of being a writer, or the public version of a writer. That’s when I’m in full on glamorous author mode, when being an author seems like a really cool gig. I go home after that and it takes a  few days to adjust. Suddenly everything feels kind of empty and confusing. Why isn’t anyone coordinating my travel, driving me around, ordering me food? Does anyone want me to sign something? I’ve got a pen…

At the end of the day, you write to finish your book and you talk to sell it. It’s creative; it’s a business; it’s a strange, bizarre world being an author, but you do it and you love it.

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Stephen Emond’s author website: www.stephenemond.com

Stephen Emond’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

HappyfaceWinter Town     Shock PointGenesisRaven Speak

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Working With My Editor, by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

I had a friend ask me, when I was working on Happyface, if I disliked having an editor. He couldn’t imagine someone telling him what’s good and what’s bad in his writing. I could see where some people would have issues with that. I’m not one of them. It would take a certain level of confidence that I’ve never mustered to assume that what I’ve written is the best it can be. I’ve only had great editors and I consider it an important advantage to my writing.

The books of mine you’ve read would not be the same had I worked on them alone. My editor (Connie) is great at taking what tends to be a rather personal work and finding the broader strokes of it. I’m often amazed at how she takes something I’ve written or pitched, and somehow understands me enough to say “I think THIS is what you’re trying to do here,” in a way that maintains the spirit of my words but also adds a laser focus to it. I see why I chose that, and how to burrow in deeper.

Meetings with Connie can also be like therapy. We’ve had very long conversations about my work (who else is going to listen to me talk about my fantasy lands for 3 or 4 hours?) where she can take away all the excess, all the extraneous ideas and pieces and really get at the core of what it is that I care about, what the story really is, taking it all apart and rebuilding it from the scraps.

Sometimes it’s rough. Sometimes I get pages of notes that pick apart every other sentence, she wants to cut half of the stuff I just know is good but it doesn’t fit. The truth hurts but she’s always right. Sometimes it takes me a day or two to realize it.

Stephen Emond - Lemons comic

My first draft of something can see  close to half of it cut. Essentially saying “THIS stuff is good, this stuff over here is just okay. Let’s cut that stuff and make it as good as the best parts.”

More than a few times, I’ve gotten notes like “Ew! This part is creepy!” or “Definitely cut this section.” I flush red for a few seconds and start deleting, glad those parts didn’t get any further.

When you’re writing 60,000+ words it gets very hard to see things objectively. At some point it all blends together, the good and the bad, and it just exists in it’s own world. There are times I just have to rely on someone else to read it and be honest with me. Connie reads my words over and over and over, always making interesting notes and comments. Sometimes she just knows the right questions to ask to get my mind rolling: “Why did you choose this setting? Why is this character here?”

Of course, not everyone has an editor at a big publisher to lean on. Find someone you can trust who can really be truthful and conversational and elevate your work, and who won’t butter you up and say the nice things you secretly or not-so-secretly want to hear. A good editor is completely indispensable.

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Stephen Emond’s author website: www.stephenemond.com

Stephen Emond’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

HappyfaceWinter Town     GlowShades of Earth: An Across the Universe Novel (Across the Universe)Hold Me Closer, Necromancer

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Writing Stories In Different Formats, by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

I’ve had the privilege to write for a few formats that are not novels. Namely, I got my start working on comic strips and was very entranced with that industry for a long time. I also spent a few years working in comic books, and because of my comic book Emo Boy I was given the chance to work on a feature film screenplay for a proposed film adaptation. I’ll talk here about those unique processes.

All of them are of course very different from prose writing, for teens or otherwise. While the heavy lifting of creating an airtight plot remains the same for any form of writing, and believe me that can easily be the most effort-intensive part of the process, there’s less focus on detail, generally because an artist or director will be supplying the actual images needed. Your job is strictly telling the story.

Comic strips may seem the easiest but I’ll always maintain that it’s a great boot camp for writing. You only need to do a small number of panels, usually one to four, with minimal dialogue, a small cast of characters and usually just the one scene. To do that well, to tell a full story AND elicit a laugh or a heartfelt moment, or to make someone stop and ponder something for a moment, is difficult. To do it day in and day out, week after week, year after year, you’ll understand quickly how hard it is to keep that momentum going. Every strip needs to set up who is talking, where they are, what the context is and then somehow turn that idea on it’s head by the end of the strip in a clever way. Sometimes a comic strip will have a storyline that goes on through a week or a month; Bill Watterson of Calvin and Hobbes fame occasionally would play a game and see how long he could keep an idea going. Watterson is especially famous for pushing boundaries and testing the limits of the form. But through these storylines you can never assume a reader has read the previous instalments. You have to assume they’ve never even heard of your strip. So not only do you have to carry on the story, but you have to address it as if this is the first instalment of the story and find a clever or quick way to recap. Every strip is essentially a tiny standalone story.

Comic books have a bit more space to play in. You can grow from a 3 panel story to a full 3 act story. Comics generally have 24 pages to tell your story in; whether it’s a standalone story or part of a longer arc, which has become more common in the past decade or two. Comics are a very visual medium, so it’s often the artist who tells the story in terms of movement and dynamics, and the speed a scene may pass along at. The writer is generally setting up the scene and delivering the major actions and dialogue. I can draw decently, so I had written and drawn my comics. I’d usually come up with a long list of potential plots, as most of the issues of Emo Boy had anywhere from one to three short stories (Issue 11 had 11 stories). Once I had decided on a plot, I’d spend a day or two coming up with jokes, scenes and a general three act structure, and when it was time to write I’d keep those notes handy and often write the full issue in one sitting. The majority of the month I would spend doing all the art.

When I started work on the Emo Boy movie, I had to learn a lot about structure and writing a long-form work. With books and movies, that freewheeling speed and quick note jotting was no good, I needed to really sit down and put everything together like a puzzle. Theme, recurring motifs, and strong set pieces all became important. I had to really think of big visual moments that would look good in a trailer, I had to see everything on a screen in my head. I had to learn to cut for the first time, because, at 90 pages, you need a clean, strong storyline and you have to be aware of any scenes that divert from your story or don’t in any way enhance or add to the story. Real estate is precious in a screenplay: scenes are generally short, a few pages long at best, so you don’t have the freedom to stroll at your own pace the way you do in a novel. You can’t spend a page talking about the flowers your character just passed. A novel can be a thousand pages or it can be 300 pages, you set your own pace. A movie needs to hit the right beats at the right times and hit them strong.

One of the best things about novel writing is the control you have over it. There’s no space demand of a comic strip or even a movie, there are far fewer hands in the production. It’s essentially you and your ideas, particularly at the start when the blank page truly is an invitation to your own world, as large or small as you feel comfortable existing in.

There’s always an option for a writer whether to express a story as a comic, a movie, a video game, a novel, a blog, a news article… there’s always a need and a place for good writing.

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Stephen Emond’s author website: www.stephenemond.com

Stephen Emond’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

HappyfaceWinter Town     Across the UniverseRooftop

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Structuring Novel Chapters, by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

With Winter Town I thought of each chapter as its own mini story, paying close attention to giving each scene a three act structure and changing the values at stake between the start and finish. A common “rule” you’ll read in writing books is that if a scene starts off positive then end it negative, and vice versa. It’s really the value at stake in a scene that gets changed. Positive and negative is just a very broad way of looking at it.

A good example from Winter Town is in chapter 14. This chapter takes place early on in the relationship of Lucy and Evan, and takes place from Lucy’s POV. What I wanted to show here was Lucy’s inner struggle and inability to fully commit to something. She’s always liked Evan, she’s thrilled to be with him, but she’s self destructive and already picking at the relationship. The scene takes place in the evening when Lucy and Evan leave Evan’s house to walk downtown to the movie theater.

I divided the chapter into three main sections; Lucy getting outside and into a more cosmopolitan hustle and bustle, Lucy and Evan discussing small town life, the city, art and school, and then arriving at the theater where Lucy’s tone shifts.

It starts positive; Lucy finds a strong energy in the night, with people all around her, the downtown lights, she holds Evan’s hand, she kisses him, she can barely contain herself. The lights are reflecting on the snow, the streets are decorated, people are all out enjoying themselves, and it’s a romantic scene as Lucy and Evan go out in public as some variation of boyfriend/girlfriend for the first time.

The “second act” plays with the positive and negative. Lucy and Evan talk about a fantasy life in the city, making art. Movies, comics, teaming up and living off art and love in a creative community. This is Lucy’s dream and Evan’s fantasy. For Evan, it isn’t real. He knows he can’t leave his family, he has plans for school. Lucy doesn’t fit snuggly into his future vision.

The third act and “epilogue” of the chapter has Lucy reeling during the movie, emotional and on the verge of tears, while Evan just watches the movie. Lucy decides that Evan can’t appreciate her or art because he doesn’t know pain the way she does. He doesn’t suffer and his life is too clean and neat. The chapter ends on a negative note as the idea is planted in Lucy’s head that she is going to break his heart.

The constant shifting of good and bad, and light and dark, creates a dynamic flow and keeps the reader wondering what will happen next, and never getting too complacent with how things are. As readers, we truly appreciate the happy moments when they come from dark places and we cringe at the dark material that follows the lighter pieces. Beyond all that, it gives you a guide and purpose in your writing. Are things going too good for your character? Too bad? Try flipping the values at stake, sooner rather than later.

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Stephen Emond’s author website: www.stephenemond.com

Stephen Emond’s bio page

***

United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

HappyfaceWinter Town     Cleopatra ConfessesBlue is for NightmaresNecromancing the Stone

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Month In Review (June 2013)

Writing Teen Novels has reached the end of its sixth month of articles for 2013 from this year’s line-up of novelists from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and New Zealand.

Thank you to all the contributors, to everyone who has been reading the articles and those who have connected with Writing Teen Novels on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Tumblr, or via Novel Writing Quotes on Facebook or Google+.

Articles for June 2013

10 Tips For Becoming A Good Novelist by April Henry

My Novel Writing Process by Carolyn Meyer

How To Find A Literary Agent by Amy Kathleen Ryan

Dealing With Anxieties During The Novel Writing Process by Monika Schroder

Bringing History To Life In Teen Novels by Diane Lee Wilson

Sci Fi Novels For Teens by Beth Revis

Creating A Sense Of Place In A Novel by Kashmira Sheth

A Novelist’s Responsibility To Readers by Elizabeth Wein

Dealing With Reviews And Critics Of Your Teen Novels by Paul Volponi

The Good Thing About Bad Writing by Lish McBride

Why Write Novels? by Bernard Beckett

Creating Life-like Stories For Novels by Kate Forsyth

Developing An Idea Into A Complete Story by Andy Briggs

On Judging A Short Story Competition For School Students by Pauline Francis

Beginning A Story: 10 Things To Consider by Laurie Faria Stolarz

Creating Teen Characters For Dystopian Novels by Sam Hawksmoor

Characters With Goals (Secrets Of Narrative Drive) by Sarah Mussi

Creating Conflict For Your Character by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

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‘Month In Review’ Updates

For more articles on writing novels you can check out Writing Historical Novels and Writing Novels in Australia.

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Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

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