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Posts tagged ‘teen novel author’

Writing What You Know, by Beth Revis

Probably the most clichéd and oft-used phrase for any writer is the old adage, “write what you know”.

So how did I end up writing a novel that takes place hundreds of years in the future, on a spaceship populated by genetically modified people heading to a planet that might not really exist? It’s definitely not something I “know”.

Typically, we don’t really “know” our stories. Or, at least, I don’t. I’ve never been the youngest person on a spaceship, but I do know what it’s like to not fit in. I’ve never had my parents cryogenically frozen, but I still remember that moment when I realized that I’d grown up and was no longer under their safe protection.

Many times, it seems that people who aspire to write teen fiction are more focused on writing teenagers than on writing characters who behave realistically. They will often do research on the outward appearances: clothing, slang, mannerisms. Very often, this is where they trip up, because that’s not the important stuff. Focus on the stuff you know – the stuff everyone knows. We have all experienced the same things every teen has experienced: first love, first heartbreak, betrayal and fear, joy, sorrow. This is what the writer must know – and if the writer knows this, then everything else: the characters, the plot, the world – will fall in place.

Find the beating heart of the story. Invention is a wonderful thing – a necessary thing when it comes to writing. You need to have invention but, somewhere beneath everything that you create, you also have to write what you know.

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Beth Revis’s author website: www.bethrevis.com

Beth Revis’s bio page

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Across the UniverseA Million Suns (Across the Universe)Shades of Earth: An Across the Universe Novel (Across the Universe)    In Mozart's Shadow: His Sister's StorySaraswati's WayThe Night She Disappeared

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

What I Read When I Was A Teenager, by Elizabeth Wein

I was a reader as a teen – I’ll make no bones about that.  I was an ambitious reader, which may be why I’ve become an ambitious writer.  So I thought I’d share some of the books I read as a teen that weren’t traditional teen fiction, and maybe scrape the surface of why they appealed to me as a teen.

How Green Was My Valley by Robert Llewellyn.  I never did figure out just how autobiographical this was.  I loved the Welshness of it, the language rhythms which were so different from my own, and the grittiness of the landscape it described.  I was kind of in love with the narrator, Huw Morgan.  Maybe that’s what I was looking for as a teen: a character to fall in love with.

I was definitely, definitely in love with Claudius from Robert Graves’s I Claudius and Claudius the God.  I read these when I was thirteen.  I was inspired by the shocking BBC television series (1976), which yes, I was allowed to watch at 13.  I am pretty sure I struggled through the politics because I adored the character so much.

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens and Watership Down by Richard Adams.  Okay, there’s no question about it, I was a literary lover.  I was enchanted by the tragic wastrel Sydney Carton.  He was my hero.  But you know what?  Ridiculously, I was equally enchanted by Hazel, the hero bunny of Watership Down.  No, seriously, I was in love with Hazel.  He was such a literary crush that I drew pictures of him (usually at some melodramatic plot point, like with his leg damaged, or getting attacked by the cat).  I drew pictures of Sydney Carton, too, standing at the guillotine, looking tragic.  I like my heroes to be somewhat damaged, I guess.

Ok, I will now skip over the obvious (Tolkien… I was in love with Frodo; TH White… in love with Arthur) and finish with something truly off the wall:  John Brown’s Body by Stephen Vincent Benet.  John Brown’s Body is an epic poem (literally) about the American Civil War.  It was published in 1928 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1929.  I first stumbled across it at 15 or so because my grandmother (my legal guardian) had a vinyl LP with an abridged, dramatic rendition of the book; it took me a couple more years until I actually read the entire work from start to finish, and then I fell in love all over again, this time with one of the several female leads.

                        Sally Dupré, Sally Dupré,
                        Eyes that are neither black nor gray,
                        Why do you haunt me, night and day?

John Brown’s Body follows the stories of a dozen different families and characters – characters with allegiances to both North and South, characters both black and white, rich and poor, slave and free, through the course of the war, describing the changing circumstances for each.  Rhyme, meter and verse style change accordingly throughout the book depending on the characters.  For the music of the poetry alone it’s worth reading, but it also does give you a general historic overview of the American Civil War.  Writing about it is making me want to read it again!

                        Jake Diefer, the barrel-chested Pennsylvanian,
                        Shippy, the little man with the sharp rat-eyes,
                        Luke Breckenridge, the gawky boy from the hills,
                        Clay Wingate, Melora Vilas, Sally Dupré,
                        The slaves in the cabins, ragged Spade in the woods,
                        We have lost these creatures under a falling hammer.
                        We must look for them now, again.

There’s plenty of hunting outside the enclosure for readers bold enough to sneak through the gaps in the ‘teen books’ boundary.  Vary your diet!

***Write with New York Times bestselling novelist Elizabeth Wein in Hobart, Australia in November 2014

Elizabeth Wein’s author website: www.elizabethwein.com

Elizabeth Wein’s bio page

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Code Name VerityA Coalition of LionsThe Empty Kingdom     Tarzan: The Greystoke LegacyAcross the UniverseThe Night She Disappeared

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Why I Write Young Adult Novels, by Beth Revis

Eventually, someone always asks me, “Why do you write YA? When are you going to write an adult novel?”

I try not to snort too loudly in their direction.

The thing is, it’s not like it’s an accident that I write Young Adult novels and it’s not like I’m just going to quit. YA is not the training wheels of adult literature.

In fact, if I may get on my soapbox for a moment, it’s my opinion that what makes YA a genre actually has little to do with the main character’s age. It is, in fact, the least important aspect of the genre. What makes a YA novel YA is: a fast-paced plot, dynamic characters and a character who is discovering his or her place in the world (this is where the age of the character tends to come into play).

These are the things I love in the books I read. I want a page-turner. I want excitement. The key here is a character who changes and, for the first time, sees his or her place in society.

An author friend of mine, Alan Gratz, defined the difference between YA and middle grade novels as this: in a middle grade novel, the main character still sees the world as it directly relates to him or her. The novel will focus on the main character’s family, for example, or perhaps the community – but the focus is pretty tight within those constrains. A YA novel, on the other hand, may start in a close location, but the main character must realize who he or she is in the world. This can be as simple as first love, or as complex as saving society (alternatively, it can also be as simple as saving society and as complex as first love).

In all honesty, I constantly question myself in my world. Is what I am doing important? Can I make a difference? Should I just give up? In all honesty, I hope I never quit questioning myself. I don’t have all the answers. I’m still trying to find my place in the world.

That is why I write YA – and why I will probably only ever write YA.

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Beth Revis’s author website: www.bethrevis.com

Beth Revis’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

   

United Kingdom (and beyond)

   

Australia (and beyond)

Across the UniverseA Million Suns (Across the Universe)Shades of Earth: An Across the Universe Novel (Across the Universe)    Tarzan: The Greystoke LegacyWinter TownGlowDeadly Little Voices (a Touch Novel) (Touch Novels)

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Inexpensive Ways To Market Your Novels, by Laurie Faria Stolarz

Author-driven marketing efforts are more accessible than ever – and you don’t even need to break the bank.  The next few posts on marketing were taken from a marketing packet that fellow author Lara Zeises and I prepared for a conference.

See what you can do for free:

Freebie Marketing:

Design a free Web site.  Try Google Pages or Yahoo! Pages for a sophisticated looking site that’s easy to produce (if you know how to type in Word, you can master this software).  THERE IS NO MORE IMPORTANT MARKETING TOOL THAN A WEB SITE.

Learn to love social media.  Whether you choose to establish yourself on Facebook, LiveJournal, Blogger, Twitter or all of the above, these social media sites are almost as important as web sites these days.  Bonus points if your blog serves a function or has a distinct personality.

Post to listserves/message boards.  It’s a great way to meet other authors and network outside of your local circle.  Be sure to put your web and blog addresses, as well as info about your upcoming releases, in your e-mail ‘signature’.

Work the online bookstores.  Create an Amazon.com “plog” (their version of a blog), or ask friends and fans to post positive reviews on BarnesandNoble.com. Don’t forget Booksense.com, the online presence for indie stores.

Create and send your own email newsletter.  What better way to let everyone know what you’re up to?

Introduce yourself to booksellers and librarians.  They can be your biggest advocates.

Sign stock.  Don’t forget to do this when you travel as well.

Arrange readings/signings.  Your publicist may be able to help with this, but if not, make an appointment to see a community relations rep or local owner where you’d like to do a reading/signing.  Even if two people show up, you’ve forged a connection.

Attend free literary events.  PEN New England’s Children’s Caucus offers awesome opportunities to hear other authors speak in my local area. Also, find out which authors are coming to your local libraries.

Volunteer at conferences.  Often donating your time will grant you access to the conference at a reduced rate.  So not only are you actively involved and meeting new people, you’re reaping the benefits of the conference itself.

Create reading/teacher guides for your book and offer them for download on your web site.  Better yet, seek out a young librarian or new teacher to do the work for you as a portfolio builder.

Donate your goods/services for an auction or charity.  Whether it’s a 10-page critique or signed copies of your book, you’re giving something back and getting your name out there at the same time.

Send a press release to local publications of interest – and don’t forget your alumni magazines.  Often you can get your publicist to send you their version, which you can then tailor for each publication.  Colleges especially love to brag about alumni accomplishments, and you never know who’ll be reading.

Open up an online store on CaféPress.com or Spreadshirt.com.  It doesn’t take a lot of tech savvy to design these promo items.  Get permission to use your book’s cover art, or have an artist pal whip up a logo for the fictional high school in your novel, or use royalty-free clip art. 

Volunteer to speak at a school, library or conference.  It’s a great way to try out new things.

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Laurie Faria Stolarz’s author website: www.lauriestolarz.com

Laurie Faria Stolarz’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

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Deadly Little SecretDeadly Little Voices (a Touch Novel) (Touch Novels)Project 17Silver is for Secrets     Shades of Earth: An Across the Universe Novel (Across the Universe)TracksThe Gypsy Crown (Chain of Charms)

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Where My Ideas For Novels Come From, by Beth Revis

Probably one of the most asked questions I have at events is, “where do your ideas come from?”

Honestly? I don’t know.

The ideas for my novels tend to come from a wide variety of places – but mostly a combination of real-life oddities and excellent books and movies.

Really, I guess the answer is: my inspiration tends to come from two words. The two most important words to a writer: “What if?”

I was recently at a Ripley’s Believe It Or Not Museum. There are several of these across America. I happened to be in the one in San Antonio. It was filled with lots of weird, true-life things. Every single thing in that museum has a story. When I can’t get to a wacky museum like Ripley’s, I tend to search online – Cracked.com and io9.com are both good places to go for weird-but-true stories. Wikipedia can sometimes also give me the fun info I need, even when I’m not actively searching for a new idea to write, I go to these places and websites and cram as much knowledge into my brain as possible – you never know when you can use a random tidbit or detail to make an existing story better. In my latest novel, Shades of Earth, I used info from my elementary school history class as a reference.

Another great place to go for inspiration is books. I read the types of books I want to write. Not every author agrees with this idea, but I live by it. Do you want to write fantasy? Read fantasy. Do you want to write romance? Read romance. When you read something you love, think about why you love it. You shouldn’t emulate it. You should find the heart of what you like. If you read something you don’t like, think of what would make it better. One of my best short stories happened because I didn’t like the end of a book I’d read – so I rewrote a story that did what I would have done in the ending.

There is no one source of inspiration. A writer doesn’t just turn the inspiration on and off. Instead, constantly seek inspiration. Find out as much as you can about everything that interests you. Stories arise from a fertile mind, nurtured with real life.

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Beth Revis’s author website: www.bethrevis.com

Beth Revis’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

   

United Kingdom (and beyond)

   

Australia (and beyond)

Across the UniverseA Million Suns (Across the Universe)Shades of Earth: An Across the Universe Novel (Across the Universe)    The Night She DisappearedSparkRikers HighTracks

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Plotting A Novel Versus Winging It, by Diane Lee Wilson

I began my first novel not really knowing what I was doing. In a burst of inspiration, I scribbled a few opening sentences on a piece of paper and gradually turned that into a short first chapter. Then I started a second chapter. And it went on from there. Whenever I finished a chapter I would ask myself: What has to happen next? I was never quite sure. I wanted to move the story along and I had a vague idea where I wanted the story to end up, but the middle was unknown territory.

Did that work? Yes, I’m happy to say that it did. With the help of my agent I sold that novel to a respected publishing house. Soon after, about the time I was doing my rewriting based on my newly assigned editor’s comments, I came across a book entitled The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Storytellers & Screenwriters by Christopher Vogler. In this book, Vogler mapped each stage of a well-constructed novel or film. Oh, no. What if I’d done it all wrong?

I read the book cover to cover and loved it, happy to find that I’d intuitively followed the basic structure for good storytelling. And I recommend this book to aspiring novelists. It shed new understanding on the roles played by archetypal characters and explained the different “acts” inherent in most stories. I also adopted a few tips for making future stories stronger.

But here’s where I slipped: When I began my second novel I didn’t follow my intuition. I used Vogler’s outline to create a “perfect” story arc. I sat on my living room floor and, with an idea in my head, filled out 3”x5” cards with sequential segments of the story. I then slavishly followed those cards to write my story. And when this novel was completed I felt it was somewhat lifeless. In my opinion, it lacked the spark that arises from seat-of-your-pants inspiration.

Each of my subsequent novels has been conceived and written like my first one. I’m aware of classic story structure and the archetypes that appear in most stories, but I rely more on my intuition to keep my reader turning the pages. At times, if I’m stuck in my progress, I might pick up The Writer’s Journey for a little inspiration. I’ll be reminded of the tension created when a hero fails a few times, or the suspense lent by a “shapeshifter” character. Then I’ll set the book down and return to my writing.

I’ve spoken to authors who have found success writing from a detailed outline but that doesn’t work for me. I simply begin each novel introducing a teen character with a problem. I know where he or she needs to end up; I just don’t know how that will happen. I also don’t know how much the character will change or develop over the course of the story – and that’s part of the fun of writing without a map: I wake up in the morning wondering what will happen in the story today!

So my words of advice would be: familiarize yourself with good storytelling, whether that’s through studying manuals or just reading the works of accomplished authors, but then sit down and tell your story YOUR way, the way you see it in your head. That’s when the magic happens.

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Diane Lee Wilson’s author website: www.dianeleewilson.com

Diane Lee Wilson’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

FirehorseRaven SpeakI Rode a Horse of Milk White JadeBlack Storm Comin'     The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for WritersShades of Earth: An Across the Universe Novel (Across the Universe)My Brother's Shadow

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

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