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Posts tagged ‘Indian-American author of teen novels’

Narrating Your Story In A Lean Style, by Kashmira Sheth

Many recent novels sometimes seem lean in the way they are written. The reader is in charge of filling in some of the blanks. These kinds of stories are rich in characters and voice but short on extraneous narration. This writing style often helps readers feel a great kinship with the main character. This lean narration is not just used for transitions from one scene to another, or from one physical place to another, but is also used for the emotional journey.

In teen novels this has to be done carefully and judiciously. If done too much, readers may feel like they didn’t get into a character’s emotional world. It could cause the reader to feel apathetic toward the protagonist and he might lose interest in the story.

One way to use lean narration while avoiding the pitfalls is to have fully fleshed out scenes with dialogues and sensory details that are relevant to the interior landscapes of the characters involved. The mood (eg. upbeat, happy, gloomy, tense or sad) can be enhanced with narrative details, dialogue and action tags.

For example, if your main character is having an argument with his parents about not doing well in school, his body language during the argument could carry the scene as much as the words he lashes out at them. At the end of the argument, what your character decides to do can tell readers how he feels about what just happened. Does he take his books out and just stare at them? Does he start studying? Or does he go for a run to clear his head and to get away from his parents?

The setting can also tell the reader a lot.  If your protagonist goes running in a rain shower, this may help show how he is desperate to get out, and maybe his mood turns more gloomy and sour. The setting can influence what your character is feeling, and you can convey this without too much narration. If he goes out for a run on a beautiful, sunny day, it is easier to believe his mood turns better.

How your character responds to the world around them also gives clues to your character’s state of mind. Say he goes out on a drizzly, cold day and, instead of making him feel terrible, it invigorates him. He feels that his argument with his parents is only one small part of his life. Just as he knows the sun will shine again, he knows things will get better with his parents. In this case, his response to the situation may indicate an inner strength and an optimistic nature. All of this can be done in a few sentences. Yet it reveals a lot about the protagonist and moves the story forward.

By using settings, metaphors, active verbs and small details that echo your main character’s feelings and disposition, you can move the story forward in a lean but satisfying way.

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Kashmira Sheth’s author website: www.kashmirasheth.com

Kashmira Sheth’s bio page

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Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Voice In My Teen Novels, by Kashmira Sheth

When I first started writing I had a hard time understanding what voice was and how I could give distinct voices to my characters. Should I have them talk with an Indian accent? Would that be enough? I didn’t think so.

I read more books, looking for voice, and as I wrote my first novel the concept became clearer. Voice is how people express themselves. It has to do not only with accent, but also with word choice, with sentence structure, with figure of speech, and most importantly with how a character views the world and themself. Beyond all that there is time, place and culture to consider.

There are regional differences in how any language is spoken. Characters speaking in English from the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States or India sound different from one another. They pronounce things differently, greet each other differently and put emphasis on different syllables. In some parts of the world, people may spit sentences out so fast you wonder how they were able to keep them from getting tangled up.  In others, people may draw out their words slowly and carefully like each sound is a nugget of gold that they have to weigh precisely.

Depending on their age or background some characters use short, simple sentences. Some use long and convoluted ones that go on and on, with the help of punctuation, and if you are not paying attention, their meanings could be lost.

Then there are figures of speech. Our inner world is colored with our outer world. The physical surroundings, including weather, seasons, terrain, plants, animals, and people have a profound impact on how they express themselves. For example, a character living in a desert might use a spiky cactus to describe a prickly personality, while a character living near a rocky beach may compare it to sharp rocks. A character’s profession will also shape the way they talk and think.  A poet may describe a sunset differently than a scientist, even though they are both watching the same sunset at the same time and same place. The metaphors and similes our characters use or don’t use reflect their environment and their backgrounds. This makes up part of their voice.

Our character’s position in life will influence how our character views the world, which in turn will impact their voice. If she is a princess she is going to view world differently than if she is a chambermaid. They both may be living in the same palace but they view it differently, they express their thoughts differently and they expect others to communicate with them differently. Again, who they are will give each of them a unique voice.

Time, place and culture will also impact our character’s voice. A modern day princess will express herself very differently than, say, a princess in the 14th century.  Also, a 14th century Indian princess might talk differently to her father than a Russian princess during the same time.

What has worked for me is to know my characters well. Then I concentrate on the scene. Once I have a scene in my mind, and see my characters moving and interacting with other people in their physical space, the voice comes out naturally.

Voice was not as elusive as I had thought.

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Kashmira Sheth’s author website: www.kashmirasheth.com

Kashmira Sheth’s bio page

***

United States (and beyond)

    

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

Australia (and beyond)

Keeping CornerBoys without Names     GlowGenesisSaraswati's WayThe Gypsy Crown (Chain of Charms)The Night She Disappeared

Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

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