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Posts tagged ‘fiction books for teens’

Month In Review (December 2013)

Writing Teen Novels has reached the final month of articles for 2013 from this year’s multi-national line-up of novelists.

Writing Teen Novels contributor Elizabeth Wein is attached to two novel writing retreats in November 2014 with Novel Writing Retreats Australia.

Thank you to all the contributors, to everyone who has been reading the articles and those who have connected with Writing Teen Novels on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Tumblr, or via Novel Writing Quotes on Facebook or Google+.

Articles for December 2013

What I Read When I Was A Teenager by Elizabeth Wein

Writing Sociopathic Characters by April Henry

Examining Philosophical Beliefs Through Teen Novels by Bernard Beckett

Bad Habits To Avoid While Writing by Andy Briggs

Handling Feedback About My Novels by Carolyn Meyer

Writing Honest Depictions In Your Novels by Paul Volponi

Writing Good Dialogue For Your Novel by Lish McBride

Creating Characters With Flaws by Kashmira Sheth

Writing What You Know by Beth Revis

The Young Adult Fiction Industry by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

Writing The Opening Lines Of A Novel by Kate Forsyth

How I Became A Writer by Monika Schroder

On Being Nice As A Writer by Amy Kathleen Ryan

Marketing Your Teen Novel On A Medium Sized Budget by Laurie Faria Stolarz

Working With An Editor On A Teen Novel by Diane Lee Wilson

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‘Month In Review’ Updates

For more articles on writing novels you can check out Writing Historical Novels and Writing Novels in Australia.

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Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Examining Philosophical Beliefs Through Teen Novels, by Bernard Beckett

I’m currently working on the third book of what I like to think of as a metaphysical trilogy. The first, Genesis, focussed on the mystery of consciousness, the second, August, on free will, and the last, my current novel Lullaby, is exploring death. All three are an attempt to both examine the metaphors we use to describe the self, particularly in a world where religious metaphors are not the common currency they once were. They’re also explicit attempts, through story, to introduce philosophy to the teenage reader.

So, why should we expect the teenage audience, or indeed anybody, to be interested in philosophy? Considering the teenager first, I would argue that the late teens is precisely the time in life where you are most likely to be excited by the essential contestability of knowledge. Part of the teenage experience is the realisation that the simple world of reliable authority figures and protectors is behind you, and ahead lies a mess that you alone will have to navigate. That’s both tremendously exciting, there’s a sense of freedom and possibility, and terrifying – two of the more easily accessed emotions during adolescence. One of the most tantalising thoughts you can be exposed to during this phase is the possibility that absolutely everything you have ever been taught or told about the world is quite wrong. What if nobody else is really conscious in the way you are? What if other people experience colours differently than you do? What if the rules of the universe were always going to change tomorrow morning? What if somebody was able to predict your every move in advance? What if you’re really just a brain in a vat? What if there’s no you at all, and the continuous self is an illusion?

The first thing philosophy does is allow you to question the foundations of your most certain knowledge, and the enduring appeal of The Matrix amongst teens is evidence enough that there is something highly attractive about this process for the younger mind. I think this is because it mirrors the personal reshaping that is going on, and also because it allows a tremendously important chain of thinking to emerge. If nobody knows anything for sure, then the people who tell me how the world is might be wrong, which means I have permission to consider the world anew, and reach my own conclusions, permission, in short, to enter adulthood.

Of course, the dalliance with the more extreme versions of scepticism is short lived. Very quickly we realise we must put down our foundations in the swampy ground of knowledge and get on with the business of living. Yes, technically is might be true that as of tomorrow morning being hit by a bus will no longer hurt, but to base one’s beliefs about the world upon this possibility appears to be insane. So perhaps all philosophy is, in the end, of no real practical use, beyond its fleeting appeal to the adolescent mind.

That’s a popular view, and one that I would argue is clearly wrong. Part of the reason I’ve included philosophical abstractions in my novels is that I love the idea of the adolescent reader forming a longer lasting attachment to the subject. Here is not the place to defend the worth of philosophy to the adult mind in full. Suffice, I hope, to point out that philosophy is something we all do, all the time. We use observation and reason to build models about our world. To ignore the theoretical framework of these assumptions is not to avoid philosophy, it’s just to do philosophy very badly. This failure matters most, I think, when we find ourselves in contact with those who starting assumptions are very different from our own, perhaps because of a different upbringing, or a different set of religious beliefs. If we don’t understand the premises upon which our own beliefs are based, then there is the very real danger of believing it’s fact all the way down. Now, two groups of people, holding opposing views and being unable to properly interrogate the root of that difference, strikes me as a very dangerous situation, and one that’s worth avoiding.

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Bernard Beckett’s author website: www.bernardbeckett.org

Bernard Beckett’s bio page

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GenesisAugustRed CliffNo Alarms     Deadly Little Voices (a Touch Novel) (Touch Novels)The Door of No ReturnThe Gypsy Crown (Chain of Charms)

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Month In Review (November 2013)

Writing Teen Novels has reached the end of its eleventh month of articles for 2013 from this year’s multi-national line-up of novelists.

Writing Teen Novels contributor Elizabeth Wein is attached to two novel writing retreats in November 2014 with Novel Writing Retreats Australia.

Thank you to all the contributors, to everyone who has been reading the articles and those who have connected with Writing Teen Novels on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Tumblr, or via Novel Writing Quotes on Facebook or Google+.

Articles for November 2013

How Martial Arts Benefit Me And My Writing by April Henry

Using Varied Narrative Styles And Formats In A Novel by Paul Volponi

On Categorising Teen Novels by Elizabeth Wein

Why I Write Young Adult Novels by Beth Revis

You Need To Love Your Characters by Lish McBride

How Do You Know If An Idea Will Develop Into A Good Story? by Bernard Beckett

Planning And Writing A Novel by Monika Schroder

To Outline Or Not To Outline? by Kashmira Sheth

Nurturing (And Protecting) Your Story Idea by Diane Lee Wilson

Novel Titles And Covers by Carolyn Meyer

Time And The Publishing Process by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

Keep Writing: The Importance Of Finishing Stories by Andy Briggs

Handling Disappointment To Be A Resilient Writer by Amy Kathleen Ryan

Different Types Of Plot In Fiction by Kate Forsyth

My Tips For Writing Novels by Pauline Francis

Guiding A Reader’s Experience Throughout Your Novel (Secrets Of Narrative Drive) by Sarah Mussi

Marketing Your Teen Novel On A Small Budget by Laurie Faria Stolarz

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‘Month In Review’ Updates

For more articles on writing novels you can check out Writing Historical Novels and Writing Novels in Australia.

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Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

Time And The Publishing Process, by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

There’s a good delay with books. It’s a time-consuming process, both writing the book and going through the publication process. Things like comic books or a daily comic strip can be really appealing because you have a constant contact with your audience. Every day or every month you can put your latest work out and you’re never far from your public’s mind. Stand up comics often have trouble doing any kind of written material because they’re so used to an immediate feedback from their material. With books, with what I’m writing now, you have to worry that what you’re writing will still be relevant, or topical a year or two down the line. Or that world events don’t render it irrelevant or distasteful, or that someone else doesn’t have the idea you’ve been spending months refining and beat you to the punch. Alas, all you can do is your part and hope the rest falls into place.

Personally, I usually have a handful of ideas on hand in various states of readiness. So, oftentimes I have a vague idea of what my next book is while I’m still working on a current project. The way I work, having a regular publisher, editor and agent, is I’ll develop the idea I want to do into a detailed outline, I’ll work on sample chapters and I’ll get a really decent-length pitch put together. This can take anywhere from a couple of months to over a year, as has been the case for this book I am writing now.

Winter Town came out in December of 2011 but I’d been working on the pitch for a while before that, so certainly over a year to develop this into a good pitch I can be proud of and ready to write. From there, my editor has to sell this idea to the other editors and marketing teams in an acquisitions meeting. A lot of people have to sign on and say yes, this book sounds good; this deserves to be on the shelves; and yes, we think we can sell this. Even if it was completely written already and was a masterpiece, there are only so many books a publishing house can put out per season. If spring 2013 is filled up, or if it’d get lost in all the powerhouse books coming out in fall of 2013, it would still get pushed out a year. Maybe if I was James Patterson they could make a case for getting it out sooner, but I’m no James Patterson.

In my case it works out. This gives me most of the year to finish writing the book. It gives us time to revise it and go through a few rounds of edits. It gives Little, Brown & Co time to print advance copies, to shop it around and build up interest before it’s officially released. To the public, it’d seem that I disappear for a couple years and return with a shiny new book, but really all that time is spent working, writing, revising, marketing and planning for the release.

It’s a lengthy process, putting a book out, with very little of the process spent in the public eye, generally right around the release there’s a big hoopla, interviews and talks and book shelves, and then it all goes quiet again as we work on the next one.

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Stephen Emond’s author website: www.stephenemond.com

Stephen Emond’s bio page

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HappyfaceWinter Town     In Mozart's Shadow: His Sister's StoryMy Brother's ShadowRikers High

Writing Teen Novels
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On Categorising Teen Novels, by Elizabeth Wein

When I went to university, I got a library card for the local library -  not the university library but the public library, because ever since I’d been able to read I got my books out of the public library.  The year was 1982, and the town was New Haven, Connecticut.  I walked into the children’s book section and couldn’t find half my favourite books.

It took me a while to discover that they were there but in a separate section of their own, labelled Teen Fiction, Books for Teens, Teen Reading, Teen Titles or something similar – something that separated these books from both adult books and children’s books.

Now, don’t get me wrong.  The New Haven Public Library had fantastic children’s and teen sections in 1982.  In my memory these two sections took up the entire basement.  They had the entire collection of Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons series (about twelve or thirteen volumes). I’d never realized there was more than one.  They had all Alan Garner’s books, which I used to use as a measure of quality in any library. He wasn’t very well known in the United States but he’d been my favourite author for many years because I’d started school in the part of England that is the setting for most of his books.

This was the first time I’d ever encountered the ‘teen’ books being separated from the ‘children’s’ books and I didn’t like it.  Alan Garner’s books were split up.  Half of them were in the children’s section and half were in the teen section.

You know what?  I STILL DON’T LIKE IT.  I think that organising books by their intended age is ghettoization.  It leads to further micro-classification that I just flat-out object to.  In the local library in the city where I live now, two of my favourite authors, K.M. Peyton and Robert Westall, have their books split not just across two sections but across separate shelves labelled Horse Stories, Times Past, War, Supernatural, Family, and probably something else I’ve forgotten.  When I first read Peyton’s books, I read them all because I found them next to each other on the same shelf.  I’d never have gone looking for horse stories.  I read them and I loved them because I loved that particular author.  I think that breaking up books into this many categories creates narrow-minded readers.  There is no incentive for the lover of ‘humour’ ever to look anywhere else for reading material than the limited ‘humour’ shelf.  There is some very funny science fiction out there but they’ll never discover it.

My own fiction is split up in my local library because Young Adult is now its own section.  I have a series that is split in my local library: the first book is in Times Past and the next two are in Young Adult.  I get that we are trying to encourage readers to explore their tastes, I get that we are trying to encourage teens not to feel that they’re reading below their level.  I still think it is idiotic to split a series across two different library sections.

So. Teen fiction?  Young adult fiction?  Some books are more difficult than others. Some books are better than others.  Pioneering readers shouldn’t limit themselves to one narrow category.  The same goes for a writer.

***Write with New York Times bestselling novelist Elizabeth Wein in Hobart, Australia in November 2014

Elizabeth Wein’s author website: www.elizabethwein.com

Elizabeth Wein’s bio page

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Code Name VerityA Coalition of LionsThe Empty Kingdom     I Rode a Horse of Milk White JadeMy Brother's ShadowWhere the Broken Heart Still Beats: The Story of Cynthia Ann Parker

Writing Teen Novels
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Who Buys (And Who Reads) Teen Novels, by Elizabeth Wein

The headline of an article published on September 13, 2012 in the Los Angeles Times announces, Most Young Adult Book Buyers Are Not Young Adults.

My kneejerk reaction to this was, ‘WELL, DUH.’

When I was a teen I never had any money.  I got all my books out of the public library and the school library.  Every now and then I would love a book so much that after I’d read it about, oh, five times, I’d beg my grownup caretakers (my grandparents) to buy it for me.  Occasionally a new book would be released in a series or by a favourite author which I desperately wanted as soon as it came out, and then I’d have to ask for it for Christmas or my birthday or something.  Or, if I really couldn’t wait, I’d buy it and not go out for lunch for three weeks.

My teenage daughter is caught in the same bind, except that I have more money to spend on books than my grandparents did, and my daughter doesn’t have to wait for her birthday or go without lunch.

If you read beyond the headline of the LA Times article, you’ll see that the statistics say 55% of buyers of books aimed at 12 to 17 year olds are 18 years or older.  Of these, 78% claim to be buying the books for themselves.  Let’s twist these statistics another way.  Out of 100 sample shoppers buying YA books, 45 are between 12 and 17.  Another 12 are buying books for their children or grandchildren.  45 plus 12 makes 57… So in fact most young adult books bought in retail ARE actually bought for young adults.  Maybe ‘most young adult book buyers are not young adults,’ but it looks like most young adult book readers are.

The thing that astonishes me is that 45% of people buying books aimed at 12 to 17 year olds are 12 to 17 year olds.  Nearly half of all printed YA books purchased in retail stores are bought by this disenfranchised segment of the market?  That seems like good news to me.

The other good news here is that adults are reading teen books, too.

Patricia McCormick, in a New York Times blog post defending the power of young adult literature, points out why adults might be interested in reading books aimed at teens.

McCormick comments that YA fiction is innovative and risky, and points to some of the more exciting literature to come out in the past ten years – in addition to the obvious (such as the Harry Potter series and the Hunger Games series).

As a reader who never stopped reading books aimed at teens, even after I stopped being a teen, I kind of wonder what all the fuss is about.  As a writer who is constantly badgered with the question, ‘But why are your books young adult?’, I am proud and honoured to be part of this risky business, where the pay is lower, the stakes are higher, the audience is fickle and the bar for excellence is constantly being raised.

***Write with New York Times bestselling novelist Elizabeth Wein in Hobart, Australia in November 2014

Elizabeth Wein’s author website: www.elizabethwein.com

Elizabeth Wein’s bio page

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Code Name VerityA Coalition of LionsThe Empty Kingdom     GlowThe Girl Who Was Supposed to DieWinter Town

Writing Teen Novels
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Month In Review (September 2013)

Writing Teen Novels has reached the end of its ninth month of articles for 2013 from this year’s line-up of novelists from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and New Zealand.

Writing Teen Novels contributor Elizabeth Wein is attached to two novel writing retreats in November, 2014 with Novel Writing Retreats Australia.

Thank you to all the contributors, to everyone who has been reading the articles and those who have connected with Writing Teen Novels on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Tumblr, or via Novel Writing Quotes on Facebook or Google+.

Articles for September 2013

Using Movies And TV As Inspiration For Novels by Beth Revis

First Person Versus Third Person Narration by Bernard Beckett

Language In Teen Novels by Diane Lee Wilson

Writing Dialogue In Novels by Monika Schroder

Writing About Violence And Physical Harm In Novels by April Henry

Using A Notebook To Store Ideas For Novel Writing by Paul Volponi

My Favourite Author Of Teen Novels by Elizabeth Wein

Embracing E-Books by Amy Kathleen Ryan

Writing Believable Teen Characters by Lish McBride

Life As A Published Novelist by Andy Briggs

Plot Structure In Novels by Kate Forsyth

On Getting A Novel Published by Pauline Francis

Working With My Editor by Stephen Emond (graphic novelist)

On Research For Writing Teen Science Fiction by Sam Hawksmoor

On Prologues And Epilogues In Teen Historical Novels by Carolyn Meyer

On Revising A Novel Manuscript by Kashmira Sheth

A Page-Turning Plot = A Character-In-Action (Secrets Of Narrative Drive) by Sarah Mussi

Writing Dialogue In Teen Novels by Laurie Faria Stolarz

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‘Month In Review’ Updates

For more articles on writing novels you can check out Writing Historical Novels and Writing Novels in Australia.

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Writing Teen Novels
www.writingteennovels.com

On Prologues And Epilogues In Teen Historical Novels, by Carolyn Meyer

Sometimes it’s better not to begin at the beginning. Historical novels for teens often cover a much longer span of time than contemporary novels, so I look for ways to make the time span more manageable. A prologue to set up the story and/or an epilogue to end it can solve the problem.

In the Young Royals series, I almost always began with a prologue. Mary Tudor, the narrator of Mary, Bloody Mary, sets the scene, blaming Anne Boleyn for everything: “Anne was a witch; I never doubted it. She deserved to die; neither have I doubted that….” The first chapter picks up the story years earlier, Mary at age eleven, and the last chapter ends with Mary’s realization that her enemy is no longer Anne Boleyn, but Anne’s daughter, Elizabeth.

The next book in the series, Beware, Princess Elizabeth, also opens with a prologue. This time it’s Elizabeth speaking: “There was a time, long ago, that I loved my sister. There may have been a time that Mary loved me. But that all changed….” The prologue is dated 1558; Chapter 1 begins at the death of her father, Henry VIII, in 1547. The novel ends when Elizabeth becomes queen.

Anne Boleyn tells her story in Doomed Queen Anne with a prologue dated the night before she is to be executed; an epilogue summarizes events following her beheading, through Henry’s death and Elizabeth’s accession.

Henry’s first wife – Mary’s mother, Catherine of Aragon – narrates a prologue from the tower where she is being held prisoner. The year is 1533 and the duke of Suffolk is at the door, demanding that she agree to divorce Henry so that he can marry Anne. Catherine tells her story, beginning with her voyage from Spain to England in 1501. In an epilogue the duke returns, pounding on the door, but Catherine remains adamant.

In the prologue to Cleopatra Confesses, the Egyptian queen awaits her enemy’s arrival. In the epilogue she summarizes the major events in the seventeen years since Caesar, her lover, left Egypt. The epilogue touches on her love affair with Marcus Antonius, a story that carried Cleopatra far into adulthood, well beyond the range of a YA novel.

Prologues and epilogues are useful tools for setting the emotional tone. The sad truth is that most of the historical novels I’ve written don’t have happy endings. Most of my queens end in prison or at the guillotine. Marie-Antoinette’s daughter narrates the last chapter of her mother’s life in The Bad Queen. Catherine de’ Medici is alive but grieving at the end of Duchessina, she has bested her rival for the king’s affections, and she will go on to make life miserable for her future daughter-in-law, Mary, Queen of Scots in The Wild Queen – another novel with a tragic ending. Queen Elizabeth is an exception. The novel ends with the beginning of her long reign.

I can’t rewrite history and save my characters from their fate or from the executioner. However, with an epilogue I can give a proper ending to a story, leaving the reader feeling tearful, perhaps, but satisfied.

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Carolyn Meyer’s author website: www.readcarolyn.com

Carolyn Meyer’s bio page

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Mary, Bloody MaryThe Bad Queen: Rules and Instructions for Marie-AntoinetteVictoria RebelsCleopatra Confesses     Hurricane SongThe Traitor's KissNecromancing the Stone

Writing Teen Novels
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Comparing Teen Fiction And Adult Fiction, by Sam Hawksmoor

I don’t think there is any conscious process for differentiating between a teen novel and adult.  Clearly in one the young adult must be forefront and in the other, adults.  Obviously adults can figure in both, but as my editor and the writer Beverley Birch says, one must give prominence to the young adult – never lose sight that it is about them.

I know from my own teaching I had one particular student who insisted upon populating her children’s novels with many, many adults.  I used to say constantly who is the story focused on?  Whose story is this?  The kid or the adults?  Never allow that confusion to arise.

I learned this the hard way.  I have a novel out there called Mean Tide, written under a pseudonym, which concerns a child who has had chemo and is sent to live with his psychic grandma by the river in Greenwich.  He meets another kid there, who is silent because of various traumas. The book is populated with adults, all with incredibly rich lives and opinions. To be honest this book straddles adult/children’s fiction and falls between two stools.  I couldn’t see it when I was writing it, as logic would dictate that when a kid goes to live with adults you have to show the adults and bring them to life.  Perhaps I added too much colour.  If your main protagonist is only twelve – there is only so much you can do with a young kid before it becomes unbelievable. Nevertheless as a writer you learn. (One hopes)

Writing for teens you can concentrate on their lives and reduce the impact adults have on their day-to-day existence.  Adults usually act as a restraint on the excesses of teens so the less they are around, the more that can happen.  S F Hinton’s The Outsiders featured this.  This was about teens getting into mischief without constraint and led by a semi-adult teen who did not have anyone’s best interests at heart.  Stephen King’s Stand By Me totally had this focus.  Not just about the kids but also about their perspective on life, the world around them and the risks they take.  It’s important to remember that these novels are written for teens and not adults (even though adults will and can enjoy them).  Kids know by the time they’re 12 that there is no justice in this world. Bullies get away with murder,, people lie, you lie, you haven’t yet formed your own opinions about things and you have doubts about everything.  Somehow you get up and carry on.  The whole world is a critic. You most likely suck at sport or math, and no one but Alice likes you and you don’t like Alice.  This is the teen world.

My approach to adult fiction is to have the plot or situation down first.  If based on a true-life story then it’s about fleshing out the characters, thinking not just about who they are but about their weaknesses and strengths. I like it when a readers connects enough with the character that they start to consider what they wear, eat or say on their own (until that starts to happen organically for me as a reader, I’m not truly in the zone).

With teen fiction, it’s the same process but with the added spice of knowing that kids won’t always take the logical step that may seem more obvious to an adult.  A boy or girl won’t instinctively know that the one they love is bad for them – even if others are saying so.  They have no experience to go on.  This is fresh to them.  All their mistakes are first time mistakes.  As a teacher I used to see girls suffering heartbreak, yet it was clear to me their affections were misplaced.  Now I see break-ups dealt with by text or on Facebook and how cold and heartless all that seems.  You are left to cry on your own I guess without the confrontation.  It can go the other way – irrational hysterical behaviour in the classroom when one girl discovers another is seeing her bloke and all three are in the class before you seething…

Adults generally don’t seethe. They might want to get revenge but the older you are the more numb you usually feel about things.  Kids are NEVER numb.  They can be unfeeling however.

Take Natalie Portman’s character in the movie  Leon.  She is entranced by the slightly simple hitman who protects her from Gary Oldman’s evil cop.  She is excited by the idea of becoming a hitwoman.  She isn’t thinking about moral considerations here.  She’s thinking about revenge, and Leon is simply showing her his one and only skill.  It’s not a kid’s movie but has a kid very much at the forefront.  She is what I remember.  Her pain and heartache and her loyalty.  This would be teen fiction now I think. Capture that intensity and bottle it.

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Sam Hawksmoor’s author website: www.samhawksmoor.com

Sam Hawksmoor’s bio page

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The RepossessionThe Hunting     Code Name VerityAngel DustBoys without NamesThe Traitor's Kiss

Writing Teen Novels
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Writing Dialogue In Novels, by Carolyn Meyer

Your characters are center stage, and they’re talking.

Dialogue, and lots of it, is one of the key components of teen fiction, whether the novel is historical or contemporary. It’s a critical part of a scene and reinforces voice. You probably know browsers who open a book, perhaps attracted by the clever cover or the author’s name, and flip through the pages to check on the amount of dialogue: too little talk and the text appears dense, and the book goes back on the shelf.

Dialogue on the page is more concise than actual conversation. It doesn’t ramble, it reveals character and it moves the story forward. Usually you need do little more than to identify the speakers at the beginning: “he said” or “she said” will do it. You can vary that with words like barked, screamed, whispered, exclaimed or shouted. Modifiers, like loudly or excitedly, are usually unnecessary.

A variation on dialogue is interior monologue, in which the main character thinks to herself or imagines a conversation with another character in which the main character takes both sides. Here’s an example from a novel in my contemporary Hotline series, with the interior monologue set in italics:

Lissa is dead, Jenny thought, letting the water stream down over her face. She’s dead and I’ll never see her again. Jenny worked shampoo into her hair. But she can’t be dead. I can’t believe it. I won’t believe it.

Dialogue can also play a major part in flashbacks, animating material that falls outside the time frame of the narrative, as when Jenny, out of the shower, remembers a conversation she had with Lissa the previous day, before the novel begins.

By all means avoid the “info dump”, using dialogue as a means to convey information. This is a common trap, which I fell into in Cleopatra Confesses. Cleopatra confides to a friend that she dreams of becoming Caesar’s wife, but she is already married to her younger brother (common among the pharaohs).

Her friend reminds her of Caesar’s complicated marital life, and Cleopatra replies, “You are right – he has a wife in Rome. Her name is Calpurnia. His first wife, Cornelia, bore him his only child, Julia, and both are dead. He divorced his second wife, Pompeia, when he suspected her of adultery.” Cleopatra goes on to talk about the need for Caesar’s wife to be above reproach, and Caesar’s disappointment that Calpurnia is barren and has given him no children. This is all necessary information, but it should have been conveyed in some other way, perhaps an interior monologue in which Cleopatra considers the situation. It’s also a clunky paragraph. (A critical reviewer pounced on my lapse.)

Here’s an exercise that develops dialogue skills and produces interesting and sometimes hilarious results in a writing group or a class. Provide one provocative line of dialogue (Example: “I told you not to open that!”) and write nothing but dialogue for twenty minutes – no description, no set-up and only an occasional “he said/she said” is allowed.

Dialogue is an indispensable skill when you’re writing for teens. If your characters are on stage, get them talking and make the most of it.

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Carolyn Meyer’s author website: www.readcarolyn.com

Carolyn Meyer’s bio page

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United States (and beyond)

     

United Kingdom (and beyond)

    

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Cleopatra ConfessesMary, Bloody MaryThe Bad Queen: Rules and Instructions for Marie-AntoinetteVictoria Rebels     SparkGenesisBoys without Names

Writing Teen Novels
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